Desert Ecology Plot Network: Mammal, Reptile and Vegetation Data Associated with Weather, Simpson Desert, Western Queensland, Australia, 1990–2011

These data are used to produce the graphs found in figure 10.25 on pages 411–412 in Lindenmayer et. al 2014, Biodiversity and Environmental Change: Monitoring Challenges and Direction. They have been combined to illustrate the vegetation and vertebrate response to weather patterns, and the interaction between predator and prey during these cycles. The data includes: • monthly rainfall data for automatic weather stations situated at 13 sites separated by distances of between 5 and 80 km. • percentage ground cover of spinifex (Triodia basedowii) • mammal abundance data for two species of rodent (Spinifex Hopping-mouse & Sandy Inland Mouse) who feed on spinifex seed • mammal abundance data for the Lesser Hairy-footed Dunnart (an insectivore) • mammal abundance data for the Brush-tailed Mulgara, a predator who feeds on the Spinifex Hopping-mouse & Sandy Inland Mouse • reptile abundance data for the Military Dragon • reptile abundance data for the Central Netted Dragon Vegetation attributes were recorded in an area occupying 2.5 m radius around six traps on each trapping grid and have been aggregated to grid level data. Weather data is collected from automatic weather stations situated at 13 sites separated by distances of between 5 and 80 km. Capture data for a specified duration of trapping nights (usually 3 night session) in the Simpson Desert, Western Queensland. Captured mammal and reptile fauna were identified and recaptures during the same session were removed (i.e. individuals were only counted once). Date, site and grid number were recorded for all captures, and captured animals were also marked by a unique ear notch prior to their release to identify recaptures. The network program uses a core of 12 sites which are sampled every April-May. The trapping survey aims to quantitatively track long-term shifts in biodiversity and ecological processes in relation to key drivers, including unpredictable rainfall and droughts, fire, feral predators and grazing. A synopsis of related data packages which have been collected as part of the Desert Ecology's full program is provided at https://doi.org/10.25911/5c13171d944fe. Sampling method: The network program uses a core of 12 sites which are spaced at least 15 km apart, each comprising two 1-ha trapping grids, or plots which are spaced between 0.5-2 km apart. The project involved sampling vegetation structure and plant species composition on the live-trapping grids (used for mammal and reptile sampling) in the Simpson Desert since 1990. Vegetation attributes (plant species occurrence and cover estimates) are recorded in a 2.5 m radius around six pitfall traps on each vertebrate trapping grid (one trap/line, selected at random - see Figure 6.5). The same traps on each grid are re-surveyed each trip; in general, these surveys are conducted around two traps each on the swale, side and crest of the dune. The core of 12 sites are sampled every April-May, however in 2012 there was not a complete survey, and so there are only 2 (Field River South and Main Camp) sites represented in this table. Other elements of the plot network’s full program share the sampling structure and core sites/plot/grid configuration of the study design. Study extent: The core of 12 sites are sampled every April-May, however in 2012 there was not a complete survey, and so there are only 2 (Field River South and Main Camp) sites represented in this table. Project funding: These data were curated and published with strategic funds from a TERN initiative to publish long term data packages in the book Lindenmayer et al. 2014 Biodiversity and Environmental Change: Monitoring, Challenges and Direction. Between 2012 and 2018 this project was part of, and funded through the Long Term Ecological Research Network (LTERN) a facility within the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) and supported by the Australian Government through the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy.
Type
collection
Title
Desert Ecology Plot Network: Mammal, Reptile and Vegetation Data Associated with Weather, Simpson Desert, Western Queensland, Australia, 1990–2011
Alternate Title
Desert Ecology Research Group Plot Network: Mammal, Reptile And Vegetation Data Associated With Weather, 1990–2011
Collection Type
Dataset
Access Privileges
Long Term Ecological Research Network
DOI - Digital Object Identifier
10.25911/5c1095b46964a
Metadata Language
English
Data Language
English
Brief Description
These data are used to produce the graphs found in figure 10.25 on pages 411–412 in Lindenmayer et. al 2014, Biodiversity and Environmental Change: Monitoring Challenges and Direction. A synopsis of related data packages which have been collected as part of the Desert Ecology's full program is provided at https://doi.org/10.25911/5c13171d944fe.
Full Description
These data are used to produce the graphs found in figure 10.25 on pages 411–412 in Lindenmayer et. al 2014, Biodiversity and Environmental Change: Monitoring Challenges and Direction. They have been combined to illustrate the vegetation and vertebrate response to weather patterns, and the interaction between predator and prey during these cycles. The data includes: • monthly rainfall data for automatic weather stations situated at 13 sites separated by distances of between 5 and 80 km. • percentage ground cover of spinifex (Triodia basedowii) • mammal abundance data for two species of rodent (Spinifex Hopping-mouse & Sandy Inland Mouse) who feed on spinifex seed • mammal abundance data for the Lesser Hairy-footed Dunnart (an insectivore) • mammal abundance data for the Brush-tailed Mulgara, a predator who feeds on the Spinifex Hopping-mouse & Sandy Inland Mouse • reptile abundance data for the Military Dragon • reptile abundance data for the Central Netted Dragon Vegetation attributes were recorded in an area occupying 2.5 m radius around six traps on each trapping grid and have been aggregated to grid level data. Weather data is collected from automatic weather stations situated at 13 sites separated by distances of between 5 and 80 km. Capture data for a specified duration of trapping nights (usually 3 night session) in the Simpson Desert, Western Queensland. Captured mammal and reptile fauna were identified and recaptures during the same session were removed (i.e. individuals were only counted once). Date, site and grid number were recorded for all captures, and captured animals were also marked by a unique ear notch prior to their release to identify recaptures. The network program uses a core of 12 sites which are sampled every April-May. The trapping survey aims to quantitatively track long-term shifts in biodiversity and ecological processes in relation to key drivers, including unpredictable rainfall and droughts, fire, feral predators and grazing. A synopsis of related data packages which have been collected as part of the Desert Ecology's full program is provided at https://doi.org/10.25911/5c13171d944fe. Sampling method: The network program uses a core of 12 sites which are spaced at least 15 km apart, each comprising two 1-ha trapping grids, or plots which are spaced between 0.5-2 km apart. The project involved sampling vegetation structure and plant species composition on the live-trapping grids (used for mammal and reptile sampling) in the Simpson Desert since 1990. Vegetation attributes (plant species occurrence and cover estimates) are recorded in a 2.5 m radius around six pitfall traps on each vertebrate trapping grid (one trap/line, selected at random - see Figure 6.5). The same traps on each grid are re-surveyed each trip; in general, these surveys are conducted around two traps each on the swale, side and crest of the dune. The core of 12 sites are sampled every April-May, however in 2012 there was not a complete survey, and so there are only 2 (Field River South and Main Camp) sites represented in this table. Other elements of the plot network’s full program share the sampling structure and core sites/plot/grid configuration of the study design. Study extent: The core of 12 sites are sampled every April-May, however in 2012 there was not a complete survey, and so there are only 2 (Field River South and Main Camp) sites represented in this table. Project funding: These data were curated and published with strategic funds from a TERN initiative to publish long term data packages in the book Lindenmayer et al. 2014 Biodiversity and Environmental Change: Monitoring, Challenges and Direction. Between 2012 and 2018 this project was part of, and funded through the Long Term Ecological Research Network (LTERN) a facility within the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) and supported by the Australian Government through the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy.
Methods
1
Weather Station setup – rainfall data
The network program uses 12 sites which are spaced at least 15 km apart, each comprising at least two 1-ha trapping grids, or plots which are spaced between 0.5-2 km apart. The 12 primary sites are spaced at least 15 km apart with an Environdata™ weather station at each site.
Environdata™ weather station
2
Data retrieval preparation – rainfall data
The weather stations record measured rainfall via a tipping bucket every minute. Data are pooled for each day. The automatic rain gauge is set up approximately 3 m from the instrument stand and housing. In addition to the automatic rain gauge, a manual rain gauge has been set up at each site.
3
Data retrieval – rainfall data
Power is maintained using a solar panel, which is angled towards the north. The information stored in the data logger is retrieved using a laptop computer (or PDA/tablet) at roughly three-month intervals.
4
Plot setup – vegetation data
The network program uses 12 sites which are spaced at least 15 km apart, each comprising at least two 1-ha trapping grids, or plots which are spaced between 0.5-2 km apart. Additional grids have been used at some of the sites. Trapping grids are set out with thirty-six traps arrayed in a grid covering 1 ha; each grid comprises 6 lines of 6 traps spaced 20 m apart. Vegetation attributes (plant species occurrence and cover estimates) are recorded in a 2.5 m radius around pitfall traps on each vertebrate trapping grid.
5
Data collection – vegetation data
Percentage cover of all species, flowering index and seeding index (from 0-5, where 0 is no flowering or seeding and 5 is maximal flowering /seeding) are recorded. This index represents the total amount of flowering or seeding per species. For example, a score of 5 is awarded if all plants are flowering or seeding at their greatest extent. Sampling intervals are usually in April-May and samples are taken at the same time as the animal trapping. Data are recorded on paper field sheets. For this data package only the percentage cover of Spinfex is included.
6
Plot setup – mammal trapping data
The network program uses 12 sites which are spaced at least 15 km apart, each comprising at least two 1-ha trapping grids, or plots which are spaced between 0.5-2 km apart. Additional grids have been used at some of the sites. Trapping grids are set out with thirty-six traps arrayed in a grid covering 1 ha; each grid comprises 6 lines of 6 traps spaced 20 m apart. The top line of traps extends along the dune crest, where consecutive numbering starts, and finishes along the sixth line 100 m distant in the dune valley or ‘swale’. Traps on each grid are opened for 1–6 nights (usually 3) at an annual sampling interval (usually each April) and checked in the mornings and sometimes afternoons, and animals are removed for processing.
7
Pitfall trap setup – mammal trapping data
Mammal fauna are captured in pitfall traps. Each pitfall is made from PVC stormwater pipe, 160 mm in diameter and 600 mm deep, sunk vertically into the ground so that its top is flush with ground level. To increase trap success, by intercepting and guiding surface-active animals into the trap, a drift fence of aluminium wire mesh (flyscreen) extends outwards from the top of each trap, secured in place by means of a shallow trench. The fence is 30 cm high and runs for 2.5 m on each side of the pitfall opening. The bottom end of the pit is covered with flyscreen to form a floor to prevent captured animals from digging their way out, and all pits are capped with metal lids when not in use. A tiny amount of insecticide (Coopex) is sprinkled around each trap to prevent ant attack.
• Pitfalls must be dug into the ground, so that the lip of the pipe is level to the ground, this can be done using a shovel. Wire mesh drift fence is bent at about 10 cm to form an L-shape and dug into the ground and pulled straight and upright.
• Open all 36 pits using a spoon or pocket screwdriver
• Make sure the mesh is directly over the open pit and there is no a lip as reptiles can use it as a bridge over the pit and don’t get caught.
• Empty out excess sand from all pits .
• Sprinkle Coopex around the edge of each pit to deter ants.
• Check pitfall traps in the cool of the early morning to reduce stress on the animal.
• Thoroughly check each pitfall, first by visually ensuring that there is not a snake or other venomous animal inside the pit. Once certain that it is safe, cover hand with calico trapping bag and stick arm down pit and feel around for any mammals or reptiles, carefully sift through the sand as Leristas and other small lizards are hard to see. Leather gloves can be worn for extra protection against bites and scratches.
• Remove any invertebrates from the pit, such as scorpions and centipedes and release at point of capture.
• Be careful when removing animals from pitfalls, do not grab any animal by the tail. Place bag over animal and invert it inside pit to safely secure animal.
• Place each animal in a separate calico bag and tie the top tightly to avoid escapes. Write trap and grid number on bag with permanent marker to ensure animal can be relased at point of capture after processing. Store the animals in large calico bag.
• Once all traps are checked, animals are processed on site and released at point of capture.
• At the end of the trapping survey (on the third day), place metal lids firmly on pitfall trap and ensure lid sits tight. Cover lid with a bit of sand to reduce exposure to sunlight and curious animals
pitfall traps capped with metal
PVC stormwater pipe, 160 mm in diameter and 600 mm deep
drift fence of aluminium wire mesh (flyscreen) 30 cm x 2.5 m
8
Data collection and capture marking– mammal trapping data
Date, site and grid number were recorded for all captures, and captured animals were also marked with unique ID numbers allowing identification of recaptured animals (related data packages contain data relating to morphometric observations, along with unique ID numbers). Ear samples are retained in ethanol as DNA samples. Any scats that are produced by animals during handling, or while they are in handling-bags, are kept in separately labelled vials for later analysis of their diet.
9
Release – mammal trapping data
Date, site and grid number were recorded for all captures, and captured animals were also marked with unique ID numbers by ear notching prior to their release, allowing identification of recaptured animals.
10
Plot setup – reptile trapping
The network program uses 12 sites which are spaced at least 15 km apart, each comprising at least two 1-ha trapping grids, or plots which are spaced between 0.5-2 km apart. Additional grids have been used at some of the sites. Trapping grids are set out with thirty-six traps arrayed in a grid covering 1 ha; each grid comprises 6 lines of 6 traps spaced 20 m apart. The top line of traps extends along the dune crest, where consecutive numbering starts, and finishes along the sixth line 100 m distant in the dune valley or ‘swale’. Traps on each grid are opened for 1–6 nights (usually 3) at an annual sampling interval (usually each April) and checked in the mornings and sometimes afternoons, and animals are removed for processing
11
Pitfall trap setup – reptile trapping
Herpetofauna are captured in pitfall traps. Each pitfall is made from PVC stormwater pipe, 160 mm in diameter and 600 mm deep, sunk vertically into the ground so that its top is flush with ground level. To increase trap success, by intercepting and guiding surface-active animals into the trap, a drift fence of aluminium wire mesh (flyscreen) extends outwards from the top of each trap, secured in place by means of a shallow trench. The fence is 30 cm high and runs for 2.5 m on each side of the pitfall opening. The bottom end of the pit is covered with flyscreen to form a floor to prevent captured animals from digging their way out, and all pits are capped with metal lids when not in use. A tiny amount of insecticide (Coopex) is sprinkled around each trap to prevent ant attack.
• Pitfalls must be dug into the ground, so that the lip of the pipe is level to the ground, this can be done using a shovel. Wire mesh drift fence is bent at about 10 cm to form an L-shape and dug into the ground and pulled straight and upright.
• Open all 36 pits using a spoon or pocket screwdriver
• Make sure the mesh is directly over the open pit and there is no a lip as reptiles can use it as a bridge over the pit and don’t get caught.
• Empty out excess sand from all pits .
• Sprinkle Coopex around the edge of each pit to deter ants.
• Check pitfall traps in the cool of the early morning to reduce stress on the animal.
• Thoroughly check each pitfall, first by visually ensuring that there is not a snake or other venomous animal inside the pit. Once certain that it is safe, cover hand with calico trapping bag and stick arm down pit and feel around for any mammals or reptiles, carefully sift through the sand as Leristas and other small lizards are hard to see. Leather gloves can be worn for extra protection against bites and scratches.
• Remove any invertebrates from the pit, such as scorpions and centipedes and release at point of capture.
• Be careful when removing animals from pitfalls, do not grab any animal by the tail. Place bag over animal and invert it inside pit to safely secure animal.
• Place each animal in a separate calico bag and tie the top tightly to avoid escapes. Write trap and grid number on bag with permanent marker to ensure animal can be relased at point of capture after processing. Store the animals in large calico bag.
• Once all traps are checked, animals are processed on site and released at point of capture.
• At the end of the trapping survey (on the third day), place metal lids firmly on pitfall trap and ensure lid sits tight. Cover lid with a bit of sand to reduce exposure to sunlight and curious animals
pitfall traps capped with metal
PVC stormwater pipe, 160 mm in diameter and 600 mm deep
drift fence of aluminium wire mesh (flyscreen) 30 cm x 2.5 m
12
Data collection – reptile trapping
Date, site and grid number were recorded for all captures, and captured animals were also marked with unique ID numbers allowing identification of recaptured animals.
13
Release - reptiles
Animals then are released within 10 m of the trap at which they were captured, either in vegetation or at sites offering local shelter.
14
Trip Report
After every field trip, a ‘trip report’ is written to document the activities, and events in the survey. The trip reports can be found at http://www.desertecology.edu.au/
Total number of captures over the survey trip were noted, and then this was standardised for unequal trapping effort. Dividing by the product of number of traps opened and the number of nights traps were opened.
File Descriptions
derg_monthly_rainfall_summary_data_1995-2011_P365T621.csv
countrainfall
definitionNumber of days weather station was working within the month
ratio number typewhole
ratio standard unitnumber
descriptionSummary data used to generate the graph in Figure 10.20 on p408 of the book Lindenmayer et al. 2014 Biodiversity and Environmental Change
maxevent
definitionMax rainfall event size per month
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitmillimeter
mean_maxtemp
definitionMean maximum temp per month °C
interval number typereal
interval standard unitcelsius
mean_mintemp
definitionMean minimum temp per month °C
interval number typereal
interval standard unitcelsius
mean_temp
definitionMean monthly temperature °C
interval number typereal
interval standard unitcelsius
meanrain
definitionMean rainfall per month
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitmillimeter
month
date time formatMM
definitionMonth
number of records2307
raindays
definitionNumber of days rain was recorded during the month
ratio number typewhole
ratio standard unitnumber
sitename
definitionName of site
nominal text definitionCharacter
totalrainfall
definitionTotal monthly rainfall
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitmillimeter
year
date time formatYYYY
definitionYear
derg_spinfex_summary_data_1990-2011_P365T622.csv
descriptionSummary data used to generate the graph in Figure 10.21 on p408 of the book Lindenmayer et al. 2014 Biodiversity and Environmental Change
mean_spinifex_cover
definitionMean percentage cover of spinifex
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitnumber
monthyear
date time formatMmm.YY
definitionMonth and year of survey identifier
number of records91
number_of_grids_cover_measured_at
definitionThe number of grids where spinifex cover was measured
ratio number typewhole
ratio standard unitnumber
scientific_name
definitionSpecies name
nominal text definitionCharacter
standard_deviation
definitionStandard deviation for mean percentage cover of spinifex
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitnumber
standard_error
definitionStandard error margin for mean percentage cover of spinifex
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitnumber
tripno
definitionArbitrary trip identifier
nominal text definitionCharacter
year
date time formatYYYY
definitionYear of survey
derg_spinfex_hopping-mouse_summary_data_1990-2011_P365T883.csv
common_name
definitionSpecies common name
nominal text definitionCharacter
descriptionSummary data used to generate the graph in Figure 10.25 (A) on p411 of the book Lindenmayer et al. 2014 Biodiversity and Environmental Change
fauna_descriptor
definitionSpecies name
nominal text definitionCharacter
mean
definitionMean number of standardised captures over all grid sites during the survey period
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitnumber
monthyear
date time formatMmm.YY
definitionMonth and year of survey identifier
number of records126
standard_deviation_sample
definitionSample standard deviation for standardised captures over all grid sites during the survey period
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitnumber
standard_error_sample
definitionSample standard error for standardised captures over all grid sites during the survey period
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitnumber
tripno
definitionArbitrary trip identifier
ordinal text definitionCharacter
year
date time formatYYYY
definitionYear of survey
derg_sandy_inland_mouse_summary_data_1990-2011_P365T892.csv
common_name
definitionSpecies common name
nominal text definitionCharacter
descriptionSummary data used to generate the graph in Figure 10.25 (B) on p411 of the book Lindenmayer et al. 2014 Biodiversity and Environmental Change
fauna_descriptor
definitionSpecies name
nominal text definitionCharacter
mean
definitionMean number of standardised captures over all grid sites during the survey period
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitnumber
monthyear
date time formatMmm.YY
definitionMonth and year of survey identifier
number of records126
standard_deviation_sample
definitionSample standard deviation for standardised captures over all grid sites during the survey period
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitnumber
standard_error_sample
definitionSample standard error for standardised captures over all grid sites during the survey period
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitnumber
tripno
definitionArbitrary trip identifier
ordinal text definitionCharacter
year
date time formatYYYY
definitionYear of survey
derg_brush-tailed_mulgara_summary_data_1990-2011_P365T894.csv
common_name
definitionSpecies common name
nominal text definitionCharacter
descriptionSummary data used to generate the graph in Figure 10.25 (C) on p411 of the book Lindenmayer et al. 2014 Biodiversity and Environmental Change
fauna_descriptor
definitionSpecies name
nominal text definitionCharacter
mean
definitionMean number of standardised captures over all grid sites during the survey period
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitnumber
monthyear
date time formatMmm.YY
definitionMonth and year of survey identifier
number of records126
standard_deviation_sample
definitionSample standard deviation for standardised captures over all grid sites during the survey period
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitnumber
standard_error_sample
definitionSample standard error for standardised captures over all grid sites during the survey period
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitnumber
tripno
definitionArbitrary trip identifier
ordinal text definitionCharacter
year
date time formatYYYY
definitionYear of survey
derg_lesser_hairy-footed_dunnart_summary_data_1990-2011_P365T893.csv
common_name
definitionSpecies common name
nominal text definitionCharacter
descriptionSummary data used to generate the graph in Figure 10.25 (D) on p412 of the book Lindenmayer et al. 2014 Biodiversity and Environmental Change
fauna_descriptor
definitionSpecies name
nominal text definitionCharacter
mean
definitionMean number of standardised captures over all grid sites during the survey period
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitnumber
monthyear
date time formatMmm.YY
definitionMonth and year of survey identifier
number of records126
standard_deviation_sample
definitionSample standard deviation for standardised captures over all grid sites during the survey period
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitnumber
standard_error_sample
definitionSample standard error for standardised captures over all grid sites during the survey period
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitnumber
tripno
definitionArbitrary trip identifier
ordinal text definitionCharacter
year
date time formatYYYY
definitionYear of survey
derg_military_dragon_summary_data_1990-2011_P365T895.csv
common_name
definitionSpecies common name
nominal text definitionCharacter
descriptionSummary data used to generate the graph in Figure 10.25 (E) on p412 of the book Lindenmayer et al. 2014 Biodiversity and Environmental Change
fauna_descriptor
definitionSpecies name
nominal text definitionCharacter
mean
definitionMean number of standardised captures over all grid sites during the survey period
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitnumber
monthyear
date time formatMmm.YY
definitionMonth and year of survey identifier
number of records125
standard_deviation_sample
definitionSample standard deviation for standardised captures over all grid sites during the survey period
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitnumber
standard_error_sample
definitionSample standard error for standardised captures over all grid sites during the survey period
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitnumber
tripno
definitionArbitrary trip identifier
ordinal text definitionCharacter
year
date time formatYYYY
definitionYear of survey
derg_central_netted_dragon_summary_data_1990-2011_P365T896.csv
common_name
definitionSpecies common name
nominal text definitionCharacter
descriptionSummary data used to generate the graph in Figure 10.25 (F) on p412 of the book Lindenmayer et al. 2014 Biodiversity and Environmental Change
fauna_descriptor
definitionSpecies name
nominal text definitionCharacter
mean
definitionMean number of standardised captures over all grid sites during the survey period
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitnumber
monthyear
date time formatMmm.YY
definitionMonth and year of survey identifier
number of records125
standard_deviation_sample
definitionSample standard deviation for standardised captures over all grid sites during the survey period
ratio number typenatural
ratio standard unitnumber
standard_error_sample
definitionSample standard error for standardised captures over all grid sites during the survey period
ratio number typereal
ratio standard unitnumber
tripno
definitionArbitrary trip identifier
ordinal text definitionCharacter
year
date time formatYYYY
definitionYear of survey
Contact Email
glenda.wardle@sydney.edu.au; chris.dickman@sydney.edu.au; aaron.greenvile@sydney.edu.au; bobby.tamayo@sydney.edu.au
Contact Address
Heydon-Laurence Building A08 University of Sydney Sydney, NSW, 2006 Australia
Contact Phone Number
+61 2 9351 7113; +61 2 9351 2318; +61 2 9351 8577; +61 420 526 801; +61 425 382 205
Principal Investigator
Glenda Wardle
Supervisors
Chris Dickman
Collaborators
Aaron Greenville; Bobby Tamayo
Fields of Research
0501 - Ecological Applications; 0602 - Ecology; 0608 - Zoology
Keywords
GCMD:Earth Science Services > Models > Weather Research; GCMD:Earth Science > Biosphere > Vegetation; GCMD:Earth Science > Biological Classification > Animals/Vertebrates > Mammals; GCMD:Biological Classification > Animals/Vertebrates > Reptiles; LTERN Monitoring Theme:On plot weather; LTERN Monitoring Theme:Plant species abundance; LTERN Monitoring Theme:Mammals; LTERN Monitoring Theme:Herpetofauna; keyword:Weather; keyword:Vegetation; keyword:Spinifex; keyword:Mammals; keyword:Reptiles; Desert Ecology Research Group; Mammal, Reptile And Vegetation Data Associated With Weather
Taxonomic Classification
Species
Ctenophorus isolepis (Military Dragon)
Species
Ctenophorus nuchalis (Central Netted Dragon)
Species
Dasycercus blythi (Brush Tailed Mulgara)
Species
Pseudomys hermannsburgensis (Sandy Inland Mouse)
Species
Sminthopsis youngsoni (Lesser Hairy Footed Dunnart)
Species
Triodia basedowii (Spinifex)
Type of Research Activity
Strategic basic research
Date Coverage
1990
2011
Geospatial Location
text
Simpson Desert, Western Queensland, Australia
iso19139dcmiBox
northlimit = -23.20549; southlimit = -23.99417; westlimit = 137.86511; eastLimit = 138.6059
Date of data creation
2015-06-19
Year of data publication
2015
Creator(s) for Citation
Glenda
Wardle
Chris
Dickman
Aaron
Greenville
Bobby
Tamayo
Publisher for Citation
Long Term Ecological Research Network (LTERN), ANU Data Commons, The Australian National University
Publications
isbn
9780643108561
Biodiversity and environmental change: Monitoring, Challenges and Direction
Lindenmayer et. al 2014, Biodiversity and Environmental Change: Monitoring Challenges and Direction, CSIRO Publishing, Collingwood, Vic.
Related Websites
http://hdl.handle.net/1885/130861
ANU Open Research, Long Term Ecological Research Network (LTERN) collection.
Other Related Identifiers
MorphoId:ltern.111; PackageId:365
Access Rights Type
Open
Rights held in and over the data
Creative Commons Licence (CC BY- Attribution) is assigned to this data. Details of the licence can be found at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Licence Type
CC-BY-SA - Attribution-SharedAlice (Version 4.0)
Licence
LTERN Deed: 23 Date of execution: 2015-05-28
Retention Period
Indefinitely
Data Management Plan
No
Status: Published
Published to:
  • Australian National University
  • Australian National Data Service
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