Three Parks Savanna Fire-effects Plot Network (Fauna): Camera Trapping, Nitmiluk National Park, Northern Territory, Australia, 2015

Typecollection
TitleThree Parks Savanna Fire-effects Plot Network (Fauna): Camera Trapping, Nitmiluk National Park, Northern Territory, Australia, 2015
Alternate TitleThree Parks Savanna Fire-effects - Fauna Plot Network: Camera Trapping Kakadu, Litchfield, Nitmiluk, 2015
Collection TypeDataset
Access PrivilegesLong Term Ecological Research Network
DOI - Digital Object Identifier10.25911/5c3e994372596
Website Addresshttps://datacommons.anu.edu.au/
Metadata LanguageEnglish
Data LanguageEnglish
Brief DescriptionNitmiluk National Park contains 46 plots, each with a paired plot located within 1 km of the primary plot. In 2015, 23 paired plots were surveyed for terrestrial vertebrate fauna using a range of survey methods.

A synopsis of related data packages which have been collected as part of the Three Park Savanna Fire-effects Plot Network’s full program is provided at https://doi.org/10.25911/5c35959d4530d.

Full DescriptionAbstract: A total of 220 permanent monitoring plots were established between 1994-2002 across three parks (Kakadu, Litchfield and Nitmiluk) in the Top End of the Northern Territory, representing the Three Parks Savanna Fire-effects Plot Network. A detailed flora and fauna survey has been conducted at each plot on a 5-6 year cycle to monitor biotic changes. Plots represent a variety of landforms and vegetation types.

Nitmiluk National Park contains 46 plots, each with a paired plot located within 1 km of the primary plot. In 2015, 23 paired plots were surveyed for terrestrial vertebrate fauna using a range of survey methods.

Camera traps were installed at all 23 primary plots and at 10 secondary plots. A 5 camera array was installed during the 4 day fauna survey, operational for a 5 week period. Current methodology has been adopted to balance maximising detection of feral cats and native mammals, including dogs, in an integrated fashion. When undertaking a standard 50 x 50 m mammal trapping quadrat, five camera traps are placed in and around the quadrat.

A synopsis of related data packages which have been collected as part of the Three Park Savanna Fire-effects Plot Network’s full program is provided at https://doi.org/10.25911/5c35959d4530d.

Project funding: Between 2012 and 2018 this project was part of, and funded through the Long Term Ecological Research Network (LTERN) a facility within the Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) and supported by the Australian Government through the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy.
Methods

Number
1
Title
Plot set-up
Description
Nitmiluk National Park contains 46 plots, each with a paired plot located within 1km of the primary plot. In 2015, 23 paired plots were surveyed for terrestrial vertebrate fauna using a range of survey methods.
Camera traps were installed at all 23 primary plots and at 10 secondary plots. A 5 camera array was installed during the 4 day fauna survey, operational for a 5 week period. Current methodology has been adopted to balance maximising detection of feral cats and native mammals, including dogs, in an integrated fashion. When undertaking a standard 50 x 50 m mammal trapping quadrat, five camera traps are placed in and around the quadrat.
One camera is placed in the middle of the quadrat and four cameras are placed in a rough diamond configuration surrounding the trapping quadrat. Cameras are placed at least 30 m apart from each other; this includes the centre camera. Cameras are placed no more than 100 m from the centre camera, resulting in the maximum distance between any cameras being no more than a 200 m. Where possible cameras should be placed in a variety of different micro-habitats within the survey area, as different species will use different parts of the landscape.
Instrument


Number
2
Title
Site preparation
Description
Determine what vegetation may cause false photos. Careful attention needs to be given to ‘gardening’ the area around the camera to ensure that any low hanging vegetation, grass, leaves, etc. are removed from the view of the camera to avoid false photos. Where necessary use secateurs to trim back overhanging leaves or vines and a fire rake to clear grass clumps.
If in doubt set the camera and trigger it to take a couple of photos, then remove the SD card and put it into a digital camera to check field of view.
Instrument


Number
3
Title
Camera trap installation
Description
Each camera trap requires an elastic strap and a bait station containing peanut butter, oats and honey attached to a metal picket.
• The camera needs to be attached to a secure support – usually a tree, but a steel picket can be used where no tree is available. Avoid trees or bushes less than 20 cm in diameter as they move in the wind causing false photos.
• The camera will be placed at ~70 cm above the ground.
• Angle the camera slightly downward so it captures the bait station in the middle of the shot, to ensure a consistent field of ‘detection’ as a function of the camera to bait station distance.
• The bait station will be set at either 1.5-or 2.5 m from the camera. Any two cameras will have bait station set at 1.5 m, and the other three cameras will be have bait stations set at 2.5 m. For consistency, these distances will be determined by tape measure. The distance that each camera is set from bait stations will be recorded on a datasheet. Bait stations will be placed approximately 300 mm above the ground. On a secure stake that cannot be easily knocked over by animals.
• Arm cameras and trigger camera to take some photos, then check images in a handheld camera to check on alignment.
• Take a waypoint of the camera location using a handheld GPS and enter into datasheet.
More detailed information on the camera trapping method used can be found in the ‘A guide for the use of remote cameras for wildlife survey in northern Australia’ (2015) following this link:
http://www.nespnorthern.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/5.2.4_a_guide_to_use_of_remote_cameras_for_wildlife_surveys_final_web.pdf
Instrument


File Descriptions

Name
tpsn_camera_trapping_2015_p142.csv
Description

abundance
definitionSpecies abundance
ratio number typenatural
ratio standard unitdimensionless
common_name
definitionCommon name of observed species
nominal text definitionCharacter
date
date time formatDD/MM/YYYY
date time precision0
definitionDate of observation
fauna_descriptor
definitionScientific name of observed species
nominal text definitionCharacter
number of records1149
site
definitionSite identification number
nominal text definitionCharacter
survey
definitionSurvey name
nominal text definitionCharacter


Contact Emailalaric.fisher@nt.gov.au
Contact AddressPO Box 496
Palmerston, Northern Territory, 0831
Australia

Contact Phone Number+61 8 8995 5002
+61 478404546
Principal InvestigatorAlaric Fisher
SupervisorsAlaric Fisher
CollaboratorsLuke Einoder
John Woinarski
Graeme Gillespie
Fields of Research0502 - Environmental Science and Management
0602 - Ecology
0608 - Zoology
KeywordsLTERN Monitoring Theme:Mammals
LTERN Monitoring Theme:Herpetofauna
LTERN Monitoring Theme:Invasive animals
keyword:Camera trapping
GCMD:Earth Science > Biosphere > Terrestrial Ecosystems > Savannas
GCMD:Earth Science > Biological Classification > Animals/Vertebrates
Three Parks Savanna Fire-effects - Fauna
Kakadu, Litchfield, Nitmiluk
Camera Trapping
Type of Research ActivityStrategic basic research
Date Coverage
Date FromDate To
2015
Geospatial Location
Location TypeLocation Value
TextNimiluk (Katherine Gorge) National Park
DCMI Box notation conformant with iso 19139northlimit = -13.81268; southlimit = -14.39819; westlimit = 132.16505; eastLimit = 132.74043
Date of data creation2016-10-27
Year of data publication2016
Creator(s) for Citation
Given NameSurname
AlaricFisher
Publisher for CitationThe Australian National University Data Commons
Publications

Identifier Type
International Standard Book Number
Identifier Value
978-1-925167-12-2
Publication Title
A guide for the use of remote cameras for wildlife survey in northern Australia.
Publication Reference
Gillespie, G. R., Brennan, K., Gentles, T., Hill, B., Low Choy, J., Mahney, T., Stevens, A., and Stokeld, D. (2015). A guide for the use of remote cameras for wildlife survey in northern Australia. Darwin: Charles Darwin University, http://www.nespnorthern.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/5.2.4_a_guide_to_use_of_remote_cameras_for_wildlife_surveys_final_web.pdf


Other Related IdentifiersMorphoId:ltern2.1080
PackageId:142
Access RightsSpecial Conditions: Users are required to contact the data provider (Graeme Gillespie) to discuss use of these data, including collaboration or co-authorship where appropriate.

Users are also required to seek permission from Northern Territory Government Department of Land Resource to discuss use of all of these data packages, and Parks Australia prior to use of data packages from Kakadu National Park.

Access Rights TypeOpen
Rights held in and over the dataCreative Commons Licence (CC BY- Attribution) is assigned to this data. Details of the licence can be found at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Licence TypeCC-BY - Attribution (Version 4)
LicenceLTERN Deed: 47
Date of execution: 2017-05-12
Restrictions: Data collected prior to 2012 is to be published as mediated, except where explicitly stated otherwise by the Data Provider.

Data Locationhttps://datacommons.anu.edu.au

Retention PeriodIndefinitely
Data Management PlanNo
Status: Published
Published To:
- Australian National University
- Australian National Data Service
Identifier: anudc:5842
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