High-Ranked Social Science Journal Articles

Do citations accumulate too slowly in the social sciences to be used to assess the quality of recent articles? This data supports research that shows that it is no more difficult to predict the future citations that social science journal articles will receive than it is to predict the future citations of articles in some natural sciences. The research uses citations accumulated in the first few years after publication and journal impact factors to predict the future citation ranks of all economics and political science articles in the Web of Science published in 2006. I find that citations in the first two years after publication explain more than half of the variation in cumulative citations received over a longer period. Journal impact factors improve the correlation between the predicted and actual future ranks of journal articles when using citation data from 2006 alone but the effect declines sharply thereafter. Also, more than half of the papers in the top 20% in 2012 were already in the top 20% in the year of publication (2006). A comparison The data includes citation data in each year from 2006 to 2012 for the 2006 articles and the impact factors of the journals that the articles were published in. The data also includes citations in each year from 1999 to 2012 for all economics articles in the Web of Science published in 1999.
Type
Collection
Title
High-Ranked Social Science Journal Articles
Collection Type
Dataset
Access Privileges
Crawford School of Public Policy
Metadata Language
English
Data Language
English
Significance Statement
This data supports research that argues that citation analysis could be used more widely in research assessments in the social sciences.
Brief Description
This data supports research that shows that it is no more difficult to predict the future citations that social science journal articles will receive than it is to predict the future citations of articles in some natural sciences. The research uses citations accumulated in the first few years after publication and journal impact factors to predict the future citation ranks of economics and political science articles.
Full Description
Do citations accumulate too slowly in the social sciences to be used to assess the quality of recent articles? This data supports research that shows that it is no more difficult to predict the future citations that social science journal articles will receive than it is to predict the future citations of articles in some natural sciences. The research uses citations accumulated in the first few years after publication and journal impact factors to predict the future citation ranks of all economics and political science articles in the Web of Science published in 2006. I find that citations in the first two years after publication explain more than half of the variation in cumulative citations received over a longer period. Journal impact factors improve the correlation between the predicted and actual future ranks of journal articles when using citation data from 2006 alone but the effect declines sharply thereafter. Also, more than half of the papers in the top 20% in 2012 were already in the top 20% in the year of publication (2006). A comparison The data includes citation data in each year from 2006 to 2012 for the 2006 articles and the impact factors of the journals that the articles were published in. The data also includes citations in each year from 1999 to 2012 for all economics articles in the Web of Science published in 1999.
Contact Email
david.stern@anu.edu.au
Contact Address
Crawford School of Public Policy, JG Crawford Building #132, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200, Australia
Contact Phone Number
02-6125-0176
Principal Investigator
David I. Stern
Fields of Research
080705 - Informetrics; 149999 - Economics not elsewhere classified; 160699 - Political Science not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objective
910405 - Public Sector Productivity
Type of Research Activity
Strategic basic research
Date Coverage
1999
2012
Date of data creation
2014-08-24
Year of data publication
2014
Creator(s) for Citation
David
Stern
Publisher for Citation
The Australian National University Data Commons
Access Rights
Open access
Licence Type
CC-BY-NC - Attribution-NonCommercial (Version 3.0)
Retention Period
10 years
Extent or Quantity
1
Data Size
16 MB
Data Management Plan
Yes
Status: Published
Published to:
  • Australian National University
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